Search
Close this search box.

Tan French Bulldog – The Cadillac of Frenchies

French bulldogs are great companions to consider. While the Frenchie comes in many colors, the tan Frenchie is a popular choice because of their rare markings. If you would like to know more about tan French bulldogs, keep reading.

What Is Considered a Tan French Bulldog?

A tan coat has a pale tone of brown. Typically, you can expect a French bulldog has some tan points, but they are not usually fully tan. If they look fully tan, you may have a fawn French bulldog, which is similar in color to tan. Tan French bulldogs typically have another dominant color. Tan French bulldog coats may include tan French bulldog blue coats, tan French bulldog lilac coats, tan French bulldog chocolate coats, tan French bulldog black coats.

Generally, tan French bulldogs are not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC). A tan coat is considered a Fad coloring along with blue, lilac, chocolate, Isabella, merle, sable, black, and many others. Typically, the AKC only recognizes white, cream, and fawn as official French bulldog coat colors. However, they will also accept a coat in any combination of those three colors, including cream and white, white and fawn, and cream and fawn.

cream french bulldog

A tan coat has a pale tone of brown. Typically, you can expect a French bulldog has some tan points, but they are not usually fully tan. If they look fully tan, you may have a fawn French bulldog, which is similar in color to tan. Tan French bulldogs typically have another dominant color. Tan French bulldog coats may include tan French bulldog blue coats, tan French bulldog lilac coats, tan French bulldog chocolate coats, tan French bulldog black coats.

Generally, tan French bulldogs are not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC). A tan coat is considered a Fad coloring along with blue, lilac, chocolate, Isabella, merle, sable, black, and many others. Typically, the AKC only recognizes white, cream, and fawn as official French bulldog coat colors. However, they will also accept a coat in any combination of those three colors, including cream and white, white and fawn, and cream and fawn.

Are Tan French Bulldogs Rare?

Tan is considered an exotic color in the French bulldog. In fact, tan points are rare details in other dogs too.  For this reason, it is a rare color. In fact, it is one of the rarest. This includes tan French bulldog lilac coat, tan French bulldog chocolate coat, and tan French bulldog blue coat.

The tan French bulldog is a rare choice because of the recessive genes. The tan point gene is almost the most recessive gene in dog coats. However, black is even more recessive. For this reason, the black and tan French bulldog is one of the rarest options.

Are Tan French Bulldogs Expensive?

Because they are rare, the French bulldog with tan points is an expensive choice. Typically, you’ll pay $7,000 for black and tan French bulldog puppies and up to $12,000 for a lilac and tan, or blue and tan French bulldog puppies. You may be able to find an adult tan French bulldog to rescue for less, but you probably won’t find rare puppies to rescue, especially a rare Frenchie given the original price.  

When you compare the price of tan French bulldogs to standard colors, you understand why tan French bulldogs are exotic. Typically, you can get standard Frenchie puppies for about $2,800. You may have to pay more, depending on the location, the age, the breeder, and the exact type of French bulldog.

Common Health Problems of Tan French Bulldogs

The French bulldog is considered a small to medium breed. For this reason, the French bulldog faces some issues when compared to other breeds. Other larger breeds, for example, are less prone to getting hurt when jumping/falling off the couch. Given their small shape, however, the Frenchie can develop many health issues at any age.

In addition, given their small size, your French bulldog is also more prone to obesity when compared to other dogs that are larger. For this reason, you must feed your Frenchie a quality dog food at every age. If you wonder what food you should feed your Frenchie, consider talking with your vet. They may even offer quality foods on sale compared to the pet store prices.

However, there are some special health issues the Frenchie faces: including breathing issues, dermatitis, back issues, allergies, and dilution alopecia. In some cases, the color of your Frenchie may even give you clues about their overall health and potential health risks.

gold chain tan french buldog
vet with tan french bulldog

Breathing Issues

The French bulldog often has breathing problems, leading to snoring and excessive panting. This is due to their flat nose. Without adequate shade and water, your French bulldog can get overheated fast, making it hard to breath. Allergies worsen this condition. You can spot allergies by looking for more scratching, especially around the ears and paws.

You can help your French bulldog breathe better by keeping them at a healthy weight. When outside, always make sure your dog has access to water and shade. If it gets too hot, make sure to bring your Frenchie inside.

Dermatitis

Dermatitis is an infection in the skin, and it is often caused by fleas or allergies to ingredients in foods. If a flea allergy is causing the condition, get your French bulldog on flea control immediately. If food allergies are causing dermatitis, it’s time to switch to a new quality dog food. Ideally, your French bulldog food should contain healthy proteins, healthy carbohydrates (not wheat), and healthy fats.

The Frenchie is more prone to complications with dermatitis because of their skin folds and bat ears. The skin folds and bat ears give a dark, warm, moist spot for the skin infection to hide. You can usually tell your dog has dermatitis because they keep itching. In fact, they may itch to the point of breaking the skin, causing bleeding and an increased risk of a secondary infection. Common areas your dog may scratch include the paws, ears, and rump.

tan french bulldog puppy

Back Issues

The French bulldog often has back issues due to spinal deformities. Frechies were bred to have short back legs and curled tails, which can affect the spine, increasing the risk of deformities. These deformities can put pressure on nerves or spinal discs. Herniated and slipped discs are incredibly common in the breed.

french bulldog yellow

Allergies

Allergies are common in the French bulldog in general. Allergies are common because of the recessive genes. You can usually spot allergies by looking for more scratching, especially around the paws and ears. If your dog has allergies, you can talk with your vet about allergy control medicine.

Dilution Alopecia

Dilution alopecia affects the tan French bulldog more often than other French bulldogs. Blue Frenchies are actually more prone to this condition because of the blue recessive gene. This condition results in the blue hairs falling out. Not only does this affect the appearance of your dog, but it can make your dog cold and more prone to skin infection.

french-bulldog-shedding

Personality and Other Traits of the Tan French Bulldog

While not a toy bulldog, the French bulldog was bred to be a toy bulldog version of an English bulldog. However, unlike the bloody history of the English bulldog (bull-baiting sports), the French bulldog was only bred to be a family companion, making them charming little creatures to have around. Their small statue and friendly personality also make them great for children.

Given the small size, the French bulldog can’t jump up on small children, which is a common problem with larger breeds. You still need to consider training your French bulldog because they can be stubborn and curious, which creates a dangerous combination for untrained dogs. You can sign your dog up for training, but there are also quality videos that will help you train your French bulldog.

The French bulldog is a great dog to consider if you have other animals or other dogs. Again, because they weren’t bred for hunting, they are less likely to chase your cat around the house. However, as with any animal, make sure you introduce your Frenchie slowly to the resto the brood.

pup and mother french bulldog

Should You Consider a Tan French Bulldog as Your Next Frenchie?

A Fernchie can be a great addition to your family, but when looking for puppies for sale from a breeder, make sure to find a responsible breeder who follows the breeding rights and laws. This will reduce the risk of possible health risk, such as chewing the paw from allergies or developing spine issues.

If you are still unsure if a Frenchie is right for you, watch some video photos to see if these little critters are the right fit for you. Even if you have kids and other pets, a Frenchie can be a great addition. Get started today by looking for Tan French Bulldog dealers.

french bulldog colors

Articles You Might Like

Share This Article

Get Your Weekly Dose of Cuteness

Subscribe to Frenchie.Army and recieve notifications on new puppy posts